TGIF …

The first date day, the first weekend day, the first chance to go out and meet that special one … or … it might be the first night alone with your favorite romance writer.

 You think it’s easy don’t you? You think you could write a book, don’t you?     

There are hundreds of thousands of romance novels in every sub-genre known to woman-kind and hundreds of thousands of readers to pluck them from the shelves of bookstores, super stores and the internet. Hard cover, paperback, mass market and e-book format, these tasty little morsels delight and titillate.

 You believe you could be one of them? 

May I introduce the “pink” ladies … 

The first recognized Queen of Romance was Dame Mary Barbara Hamilton Cartlan, born in England, in 1901 and died 2000 at the age of 98. In the mid 1990’s she had sold over one billion books and Vogue magazine called her …”the true Queen of Romance.” 

A wonderful fact about her life is her love of the color pink. The official web page is in pink, her collection of books are called her “pink” books and she was known for her beautiful pink clothes.

Visit this extraordinary lady and see the roots of Harlequin, our obsession with romance and its evolution to todays risqué tales of love and lust.  

 The second woman given the crown of “Queen” is Danielle Fernande Dominique Muriel Emily Schuelein-Steel. Thankfully, she writes under her maiden name of Danielle Steel. Born in 1947, this lady has produced more steam than the New York Tennis and Racquet Club. 

 This information taken from her bio. Again, to her web page. Ms. Steel has sold more than 580 million copies of her books (as of 2005) worldwide and is the eighth best-selling writer of all time. Her novels have been on the New York Times bestseller list for over 390 consecutive weeks and 22 have been adapted for television. 

A cultural icon, Danielle Steel combined her love of the arts and fashion, with her desire to communicate the complexities of the traditional romance story. Intrigue and suspense may surround many of her plots, but be assured, boy will eventually meet and marry girl. 

 Recently, Romance Writers of America recognized yet another “Queen.” Nora Roberts, born Eleanor Marie Robertson, has written over 165 books under several names. One such is J.D. Robb, the pen name used for her popular futuristic In Death series, now totalling 37 books.

Nora Roberts was the first author to be inducted into The Romance Writers of America Hall of Fame. As of 2006, her novels had spent a combined 660 weeks on the New York Times Bestseller List, including 100 weeks in the number-one spot. Over 280 million copies of her books are in print, including 12 million copies sold in 2005 alone.

 The In Death series and many of her stand-alone, single title novels, have strong mystery and suspense themes, but regardless of the sub-genre, Nora Roberts writes romance and the girl always gets her man. 

#####

The Rant …

What this communicates, is that these women sell books.  

So you think you have a great idea for a book that could be a best seller, get made for movies, become a series, and get you mega-bucks-fans and fame? 

Sorry, it’s not that easy. Whether you are a writer of “literature” or popular fiction, if you are a free-lance journalist, or a poet, the work you do is damn hard. 

And while I will concede that, yes, anyone can write a book, I will point out that few people might buy them. Does the sale validate the career? Not in literature it seems. But to be fair, few would want to buy them and fewer yet would want to read them. 

No, it is not easy to write a literary novel. 

Conversely, therefore, it must be a snap to write popular fiction.

The amazing statistics of just these three are not the results of marketing techniques, or gimmicks. They are the results of hard work.

Writing a book, dear ones, is difficult, challenging and back, breaking fun

The muse does not climb into your bed and speak to you in dreams. You do not sit down for a few days, write the details of the dream on a yellow pad and go out and get a manicure. 

The muse, no matter in what language or style, is a tricky little bitch … be careful or she might bite you on the backside to shake up your brain. 

Stop making excuses. Sit down and do what you need to do. 

So the market is off and the economy sucks. E-publishing is making the Big Six nervous … does it always have to be David and Goliath? 

Self-publishing went from don’t to it … to why not?

What makes you think you’ll be the one percent to succeed? 

What makes me think I’ll be the one percent to succeed? 

What makes you think I won’t? 

Have a good week
End with a smile and, 

fOIS

 

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1 Comment

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One response to “TGIF …

  1. christicorbett

    Florence,
    Thanks for the brief, yet extremely interesting, bio on each of these authors.

    I grew up reading my mom’s Danielle Steel novels and still am amazed how each of her earlier books was so different from the next, and the characters so developed.

    Here’s hoping to you becoming one of the next “one percent” 🙂

    Thanks for a great post!
    Christi Corbett
    http://christicorbett.wordpress.com

    Like

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